Syllabus – ENGL 381

Journalism and New Media – Syllabus – Dauphin – Fall 2015 

TERM: Loyola Marymount University, Fall 2015

COURSE TITLE: Journalism and New Media

COURSE NUMBER: ENGL 3381-02

SECTION TIMES/DAYS: W 7:10 pm-10:10 pm at UNH 3111

INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION  

Gary Dauphin

Office UNH 3827

Gary.Dauphin@lmu.edu

Twitter: @ebogjonson

https://lmujournalismandnewmedia.wordpress.com/

OFFICE HOURS: W 5 – 7 p.m.; Google Hangout and Skype available by request

“The reports of my death have been greatly exaggerated.” – Mark Twain 

“I pondered all these things, and how [some] fight and lose the battle, and the thing that they fought for comes about in spite of their defeat, and when it comes turns out not to be what they meant, and [others] have to fight for what they meant under another name.” – William Morris

COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS

Over the last two decades, the practice, business, and art of journalism have all undergone epochal changes. Today, emerging and established journalists alike navigate an unpredictable landscape full of challenges: shrinking budgets, dying brands, complicated technologies, and lolcat overload. But our era also puts new storytelling vehicles, richer multimedia formats, and powerful investigative tools—even new audiences—right at every journalist’s fingertips.

In this moment of change, it’s difficult to say exactly what the media work of tomorrow will be. But, today, the need for agile, digitally literate journalists is greater than ever.

This course will introduce students embarking on journalism careers to emerging digital and new media practices through the examination of websites, blogs, podcasts, social media networks, and transmedia experiences. Students will also read the works of media thinkers such as Henry Jenkins, Clay Shirky, and Andy Carvin. Students will be encouraged to use a broad range of digital and social tools, such as podcasts, video, slideshows, and, yes, animated .gifs, in weekly blog postings and papers/presentations. They will learn how to examine the editorial and formal elements of traditional media websites such as The New York Times.com, as well as those of newer sites such as The Huffington Post, Buzzfeed, and others. They will learn how to become creators of new media, using its diverse digital tools to tell stories, analyze the world around them, and find their own voices.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students who successfully complete the class will have:

  • become conversant in foundational concepts of digital/new media theory and participatory media and be able to speak knowledgeably about how these concepts relate to current problems in journalism [Keywords: CONCEPTS & PROBLEMS]
  • become conversant with broad ethical and economic implications of new/digital media [Keywords: ETHICS & ECONOMICS]
  • become able to meaningfully evaluate and analyze professional journalistic multimedia packages and websites [Keywords: EVALUATE & ANALYZE]
  • gained basic fluency in the following digital production practices: blogging, web photography, web audio, web video and concepts in project management [Keywords: BLOGGING, WEB PHOTOGRAPHY, WEB AUDIO, WEB WEB VIDEO & PROJECT MANAGEMENT]

PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND

  • ENGL 110 and upper division standing
  • ENGL 206 or 301 (Writing for Journalism 1 and 2)

REQUIRED TEXTS

  • MarkBriggs, Journalism Next: A Practical Guide to Digital Reporting and Publishing 3rd Edition
  • Andy Carvin, Distant Witness
  • Weekly readings

CLASS FORMAT AND WORK LOAD

This is a hybrid class roughly divided in thirds: In-class exercises, discussion and participation, out-of-class reading and research, out-of-class website and multimedia production. Be forewarned that the class begins with a steep multimedia learning curve and moves from there to independent work.

In order to successfully complete this class, each student must do the following:

Participate: Active class participation is the foundation of this course. This means contributing to discussions and attacking in-class exercises with enthusiasm and vigor.

Complete all readings: Students must arrive in class having completed all assigned readings. 

Use Twitter: Each week, the student will tweet a single link out sharing something of note or interest that they have found relating to journalism and new media practice and issues. This means, by definition, that students should devote a fair amount time to serving the web, looking at news sites and engaging with the work of their professional peers online. The tweet must be sent before Tuesday at 5pm and must include the hashtag #LMUeng381. 

Blog about the reading: Students will each maintain a blog in which they must post once a week about the reading. These reading blogs must be a minimum of 250 words. Reading-related posting will document the student’s personal reactions to themes and issues in the reading.

Through these posts, students must demonstrate cumulative awareness of and insights into weekly class topics and readings. If a reading in Week 7 references a core concept from Week 3, the post should indicate that the student has independently recognized this connection.

Reading related postings are due Tuesday at 5 p.m. Late postings will be graded downward.

Complete all other blog posts and multimedia exercises: At least every other week, students will be asked to write an additional topical blog or create a multimedia piece for posting to their blog. These topical posts and multimedia pieces will vary in length, but should be considered the primary focus of the student’s work for the week.

Students may use these second posts/elements to experiment in tone and approach. Within the broad confines of the assignment (say, a photo post must use photos) students can use these posts to explore and express their own interests within the general framework of problems/issues in journalism, new/digital media, media ethics/economics etc. The web is a huge place and houses many different voices, concerns and approaches. Student blogs should reflect this.

Secondary posts will be graded based on originality, clarity, inclusion of covered material, use of multimedia, and interactivity.Most importantly, all such exploratory postings must still be factual, civil, and grammatical. Postings are due Tuesday at 5 p.m. Late postings will be graded downward.

Give an in-class Presentation (Solo): Each student will follow one news or media organization’s digital presence throughout the duration of the course and do an in-class presentation on their organization. (“Digital presence” is defined as the organization’s main website and social media extensions on platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, Google+, Tumblr and so on.) The student will be responsible for reporting to the rest of the class on practices, approaches, site changes, online community activities, and innovations that take place on their organization’s websites and social media accounts over the course of the semester.

Blogs/organizations/sites that can be studied (you may also suggest your own): National or international print and broadcast media such as The New York Times, NPR, The Atlantic, Al Jazeera America, The Guardian, The BBC, Good Magazine, or CNN. Local or regional media such as The Los Angeles Times, LA Observed or KPCC. Tech news websites such as Mashable, The Verge, Quartz, or TechCrunch. Web-only news brands such as Buzzfeed, The Daily Beast, the Huffington Post, Slate, The Root, or Gawker. Sports, food, fashion, ethnic and other targeted media may be used.

The in-class presentation will be given during the semester and should take 10-15 minutes. Student should: explain what the site is; walk the class through its structural aspects such as design or format; critique at least one posting/story on the site; discuss the site’s audience and size (using tool such as Quantcast or Alexa), discuss the economics of the site; discuss their use of social media; et cetera.

Complete a Group Final Project:Students will form groups of 3 to create a multimediafinal project. This project will explore a to-be-determined news story and will supported by multimedia (i.e. a slideshow, video, audio, embedded social media, animated gifs, etc). The report should be posted to one of the group member’s blogs and take 15-20 minutes to experience, which is to say, to read and consume any associated media. The report is due at final exam time (December 9th at 7:10 p.m.) in place of an exam.

Final Projects will be developed in stages, with rolling deadlines:

  • Story pitches, due Oct. 7. Write one paragraph for each story idea. Include information about why you think this subject is interesting (what news values does it serve?), what your unique angle is, who your audience is, and what tools you will use for your reporting and presentation.
  • A project sitemap and multimedia plan, due Oct. 14.
  • A Reporting plan due Oct. 21. This should be a one-page, detailed schedule outlining the work the group will need to do to report story and by when it should be completed. What kind of background research do you need to do? What interviews will you be conducting? Will you be conducting a poll, and if so, how? What other data will you be collecting and how will you analyze it? What media tools will you use – video, audio, photos, maps, polls, etc? When will you complete research and move on to editing, analysis, design, and uploading? Who is in charge of what aspect of the reporting/editing/design?

Exams and Quizzes: There are no scheduled exams or quizzes. If students don’t seem to be doing the reading, there will be pop quizzes to check their completion of weekly reading requirements.

tl;dr – Do the reading. Surf, read, watch. Update your blog. Tweet. Find a site you like and visit it regularly; be prepared to discuss and write about said site. Work together with two other classmates to make me something awesome in December.

GRADING

Participation is key to new media and to this class. You are expected to show up every week and contribute to classroom discussions. All work also must be handed in on time: in journalism, deadlines are deadly serious. Blogs posted between 5:00 p.m. and 11:59 p.m. on Tuesday will automatically be graded down one letter grade. Blogs posted between 12:00 a.m. Wednesday and 7:00 p.m. Wednesday will be graded down two letter grades.  No blogs will be accepted after 7:00 p.m on Wednesday.

Course grades will be calculated as follows:

  1. Class participation – discussion and exercises: 25 percent of grade. Missing more than two classes will lower your grade a full letter. Missing more than five will result in automatic failure.
  2. Tweets: 5 percent
  3. In-class presentation: 10 percent of grade
  4. Blogging: 30 percent of grade.
  5. Final project: 30 percent of grade. (40% of the total final project grade will be for preparatory items – pitches, site maps, interview plan, work plan. The remaining 60% will be for the project itself.)

Students can earn extra credit for doing three extra posts with professor’s prior approval. These extra credit posts must be on a topic covered in class. Any extra credit posts must be posted before December 16th.

Grading rubric:

  • A’s are reserved for excellent work:
    • Work that is original in its ideas
    • Shows mastery of the reading
    • Shows mastery of new media skills
    • Shows thorough reporting and investigation e. Is clear
    • Has a strong and distinct voice.
  • B’s are for work that shows awareness of the reading, competence in its new media skills, adequate reporting and investigation, and is clear.
  • C’s are for work that does not reflect knowledge of the reading, is weak in its use of new media, reflects little reporting, and lacks clarity.
  • D’s are for work that does not meet the assignment requirements or is late.
  • F’s are for work that is late, plagiarized, not of college-level quality, or is missing.
  • Credit will be given for improvement made during the course during final grading.

ELECTRONICS AND SOCIAL MEDIA IN CLASS

Laptop use is a required part of the weekly class. Students are encouraged to live-tweet the class using the hashtag #LMUENGL381. That said, Twitter is not to be used for personal or social reasons. Facebook is not to be used in class, EVER. Students using who repeatedly se social media for non-class purposes during class will have their class participation grade reduced by one letter grade.

Cell phones are not to be used in class, except during practicums and for the above reasons.

The instructor will not accept Facebook or LinkedIn requests from students while they are students in his class.

ACADEMIC HONESTY

Academic dishonesty will be treated as an extremely serious matter, with serious consequences that can range from receiving no credit for assignments/tests to expulsion.  It is never permissible to turn in any work that has been copied from another student or copied from a source (including Internet) without properly acknowledging the source.  It is your responsibility to make sure that your work meets the standard of academic honesty set forth in the “LMU Honor Code and Process” which appears in the LMU Bulletin 2010-2011.) In journalism, plagiarism will end your career.

AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT 

Students with special needs as addressed by the Americans with Disabilities Act who need reasonable modifications, special assistance, or accommodations in this course should promptly direct their request to the Disability Support Services Office.  Any student who currently has a documented disability (physical, learning, or psychological) needing academic accommodations should contact the Disability Services Office (Daum Hall Room 224, 310-338-4535) as early in the semester as possible. All discussions will remain confidential. Please visit http://www.lmu.edu/dss for additional information.

TO PROMOTE CLASSROOM RESPECT

As an LMU Lion, by the Lion’s code, you are pledged to join the discourse of the academy with honesty of voice and integrity of scholarship and to show respect for staff, professors, and other students

COMMUNICATIONS

We will primarily use the class WordPress blog, https://lmujournalismandnewmedia.wordpress.com/ to communicate. All news, readings, announcements, and syllabus changes will be posted there. Every student must subscribe to this blog. In addition, I will occasionally email you using your LMU Lion email account and post readings in MYLMU Connect. Grades will be posted in MYLMU Connect.

SCHEDULE 

Note: This schedule is provisional and may be re-arranged to accommodate guest speakers.

Week 1 – September 2 – Hello World

  • Assignment Due This Week: None, you just got here!
  • Reading Due This Week: None, you just got here!
  • Discussion
    • Introductions
    • A Personal Technology Timeline
  • Assignments for Next Week [Email links to posts to Professor by 5pm on Tuesday at Dauphin@lmu.edu]
    • Read, watch, surf – Tweet a link at me for us to discuss with hashtag #LMUeng381
    • Create a wordpress blog
    • Select and apply a FREE ($0.00) WordPress theme. Be ready to defend your choice.
    • Do next week’s reading and blog about it. What does “code” mean to you? What is a “web worker?” Is a journalist a coder? Should they be?
    • Create a short “ABOUT ME” blog post. Who are you? Why do you want to be a journalist? What most excites you about today’s digital media environment? What scares you? Feel free to include your own “personal technology timeline.”

Week 2 – September 9 – What is the Web?

  • Assignments Due This Week: Tweets, blog and selected theme, reading posts, About blog post.
  • Reading Due This Week
  • Discussion
    • Discussion of #LMUeng381 links
    • What is the web?
    • Discussion of readings / your blog posts
    • Review About posts
  • Practicum
    • Basics of web architecture – case study: Annenberg.usc.edu
    • Discussion of blogs and themes. Any problems?
    • Chrome tools – How to view code
    • Required Tools and Account Set up
    • Recommended Tools and Account Set up
    • Assignments for Next Week [Email links to posts to Professor by 5pm on Tuesday at Dauphin@lmu.edu]
      • Read, watch, surf – Tweet a link at me for us to discuss with hashtag #LMUeng381
      • Do next week’s reading and blog about it. What does “blog” mean to you? Isn’t everything a blog? What isn’t a blog?
      • Find three blogs or sites that you would like to follow for the semester. Be prepared to explain why you’re interested in each. Post your list in a second post to your blog, making sure to indicate your top choice and use screen grabs and embedded media (if available) from each site. Indicate whether you’d like to present the first, middle or last group by adding an animated gif, emoji or video clip to the bottom of your post.
      • Bring in what you have access to use for photography – phones or cameras
      • Take 16 photos of a single day at life at LMU this week. These can be anything: students, classes, architecture, movement. They don’t need to be perfect, but endeavor to make them clear, in focus and properly exposed. Post these photos to your Flickr stream

Week 3 – September 16 – Posts, Blogs, Content Management Systems

  • Assignments Due This Week: Tweets, blog about readings, blog about 3 sites ideas for preso, 16 photos on Flickr, bring photo tools to class
  • Reading Due This Week
  • Discussion
    • Discussion of #LMUeng381 links
    • Discussion of readings / your blog posts
    • Discussion of Site Ideas
      • How to review a site – case study: The Loyolan
      • Selection of ideas
    • Practicum
      • Photo Bingo
      • Let’s talk photographic equipment: Flickr apps, storage, lighting, tripods, editing, posting to Flickr
      • Tool review as needed. Problems?
      • Posting images to WordPress – files, metadata, captions
      • LMU multimedia equipment access
    • Assignments for Next Week [Email links to posts to Professor by 5pm on Tuesday at Dauphin@lmu.edu]
      • Read, watch, surf – Tweet a link at me for us to discuss with hashtag #LMUeng381
      • Do next week’s reading and blog about it. Are you a digital native? Immigrant? How are these ideas located in time (i.e., the time the essays were written.)
      • Edit your 16 images down to 8 strong images. Post them sequentially (not in a gallery) to a post in your blog and add text describing each. The text and images should suggest a theme or story. (Consult Briggs reading for next week for any issues: Chapter 5: Visual Storytelling with Photographs)
      • Bring in what you have access to for audio – cellphones, digital recorders and headphones
      • Expand your class Twitter list with a minimum of 10 follows. Post a link to your list on your blog. Be prepared to discuss why you selected them next week.
      • Populate your Feedly reading list with a minimum of 10 sources. List the sources on your blog. Be prepared to discuss why you selected them next week.
      • [Ongoing: Track your site.]

Week 4 – September 23 – New Media, New Audiences

  • Assignment Due This Week: Tweets, posts about readings, photo post, Twitter list, Feedly list, bring audio tools to class
  • Reading Due This Week
    1. Marc Prensky, Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants Part 1 – http://www.marcprensky.com/writing/Prensky%20-%20Digital%20Natives,%20Digital%20Immigrants%20-%20Part1.pdf
    2. Henry Jenkins, Reconsidering Digital Immigrants – http://henryjenkins.org/2007/12/reconsidering_digital_immigran.html
    3. [Watch] Frontline, The Digital Nationhttp://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/digitalnation/view/
    4. Mark Briggs, Journalism Next – read Chapter 5: Visual Storytelling with Photographs
  • Discussion
    1. Discussion of #LMUeng381 links
    2. Discussion of readings / your blog posts
    3. Discussion of Photo Posts –  What makes good photo?
    4. Discussion of Twitter Lists
    5. Discussion of Feedly lists
  • Practicum
    1. Let’s talk audio equipment: apps, Audacity, posting to SoundCloud and WordPress
    2. Review basic audio techniques
    3. com video on Audacity: http://www.lynda.com/course/shareredirect/111697?org=lmu.edu
    4. Live audio run-through
    5. Tool review as needed. Problems?
  • Assignments for Next Week [Email links to posts to Professor by 5pm on Tuesday at Dauphin@lmu.edu]
    1. Read, watch, surf – Tweet a link at me for us to discuss with hashtag #LMUeng381
    2. Do next week’s reading and blog about it. What are the implications of new populations and new practices on the news business?
      • [Optional blog topic: Blog about Frontline’s The Digital Nation]
    3. Create a two minute audio track based on your image sequence and text. Upload to Soundcloud and also create a post on your blog embedding your audio. (Consult Briggs reading for next week for any issues: Chapter 6: Making Audio Journalism Visible)
    4. [Ongoing: Track your site.]

Week 5 – September 30 – New Media, New Practices

  • Assignment Due This Week: Tweets, posts about readings, audio post
  • Reading Due This Week
    • Dan Gillmor, We the Media, chapters 1 and 3, http://oreilly.com/catalog/wemedia/book/
    • Mark Briggs, Journalism Next – read Chapter 3: Crowd-powered Collaboration (pgs 91-114) and Chapter 6: Making Audio Journalism Visible
  • Discussion
    • Discussion of #LMUeng381 links
    • Discussion of readings / your blog posts
    • Discussion of audio posts
  • Practicum
    • Putting together a Youtube slideshow
    • Tool review as needed. Problems?
    • Assemble groups for group projects (Randomized); discuss final projects and pitch format
  • Assignments for Next Week [Email links to posts to Professor by 5pm on Tuesday at Dauphin@lmu.edu]
    • Read, watch, surf – Tweet a link at me for us to discuss with hashtag #LMUeng381
    • Do next week’s reading and blog about it. What are the implications of these new tools for rights, rights management, copyright? Are you a Copyright Criminal?
    • Turn your images and audio into a 2 minute Youtube slideshow. Post to web. Indicate CC license found at creativecommons.org
    • [Ongoing: Track your site.]

Week 6 – October 7 – Digital Rights and Wrongs 

  • Assignment Due This Week: Tweets, posts about readings, audio slideshow with CC license, Project pitches
  • Reading Due This Week
  • Discussion
    • Discussion of #LMUeng381 links
    • Fair Use Quiz
    • Discussion of readings / your blog posts
    • Watch first 15 minutes of Copyright Criminals https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIoR3PYpduo
    • Discussion of slideshow posts –  What makes good audio slideshow?
  • Practicum
    • Review Project Management elements: site map, wireframes, multimedia plan, reporting plan, production plan
    • Discuss Final projects and pitches in groups
    • Tool review as needed
    • Problems?
  • Assignments for Next Week [Email links to posts to Professor by 5pm on Tuesday at Gary.Dauphin@lmu.edu]
    • Read, watch, surf – Tweet a link at me for us to discuss with hashtag #LMUeng381
    • Watch rest of Copyright Criminals at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIoR3PYpduo
    • Blog about Copyright Criminals 
    • Groups come up with 3 project pitches. Nominate someone to post pitch to blog. Write one paragraph for each story idea. Include information about why you think this subject is interesting (what news values does it serve?), what your unique angle is, who your audience is, and what tools you will use for your reporting and presentation.
    • Review your blog for copyright issues.
      • does every post have an image?
      • Are there any copyright or fair use issues?
      • Select a Creative Commons license for your images.
      • Apply to WordPress blog and Flickr images
    • Bring in video equipment
    • [Ongoing: Track your site.]

Week 7 – October 14 – The Social Media Revolution, Part 1 

  • Assignment Due This Week: Tweets, posts about readings/blog about Copyright Criminals, copyright review and Creative Commons licenses, final pitches, bring in video equipment
  • Reading Due This Week
    • Andy Carvin, Distant Witness, Sections “Prologue,” “Tunisia,” and “Egypt”
    • Mark Briggs, Journalism Next – read Chapter 4: Going Mobile
  • Discussion
    • Discussion of #LMUeng381 links
    • Discussion of readings / your blog posts
    • Assess copyright status of your blogs
  • Practicum
    • Let’s talk video equipment: apps, cameras, lighting, editing posting to youtube and WordPress
    • Watch Lynda.com video, http://www.lynda.com/Premiere-Pro-tutorials/Documentary-Editing- Premiere-Pro/105388-2.html
    • The BBC 5-Shot method
    • Present pitches
    • Discuss / build site map and wireframes in class. Take pictures
    • Tool review as needed
    • Problems?
  • Assignments for Next Week [Email links to posts to Professor by 5pm on Tuesday at Dauphin@lmu.edu]
    • Read, watch, surf – Tweet a link at me for us to discuss with hashtag #LMUeng381
    • Do next week’s reading and blog about it. How has video changed the journalism landscape?
    • Post Sitemap and Wireframes to one of your blogs
    • Prepare your interview, multimedia and production plan. Post to one of the group’s blogs. This should be a one-page detailed schedule of the work you will need to do for your story and by when it should be completed. What kind of background research do you need to do? What interviews will you be conducting? Will you be conducting a poll, and if so, how? What other data will you be collecting and how will you analyze it? What media tools will you use – video, audio, photos, maps, polls, etc? When will you complete research and move on to editing, analysis, design, and uploading? Who is in charge of what aspect of the reporting/editing/design?
    • Post your in class video to Youtube and your Blogs
    • [Ongoing: Track your site.]

OCTOBER 21 – CLASS CANCELLED DUE TO PROFESSOR EMERGENCY

Week 8 – October 28 – The Social Media Revolution, Part 2 

  • Assignment Due This Week: Tweets, posts about readings, Interview and Production Plans
  • Reading Due This Week
    • Andy Carvin, Distant Witness, Sections “Yemen,” “Syria,” and “Epilogue”
  • Discussion
    • Discussion of #LMUeng381 links
    • Discussion of readings / your blog posts
  • Practicum
    • Livetweet 30 tweets in hour / minimum
    • Review Interview, Multimedia and Production Plans
    • Tool review as needed
    • Problems?
  • Assignments for Next Week [Email links to posts to Professor by 5pm on Tuesday at Dauphin@lmu.edu]
    • Read, watch, surf – Tweet a link at me for us to discuss with hashtag #LMUeng381
    • Create liveblog post out of your tweets
    • [Ongoing: Work on Final Project.]
    • [Ongoing: Track your site.]

Week 9 – November 4 – Data and Other Maths 

  • Assignment Due This Week: Tweets, LiveTweet Posts, Project Updates
  • Reading Due This Week
  • Discussion
    • Discussion of #LMUeng381 links
    • Discussion of readings
    • LiveTweet Republican Debate posts
  • Practicum
    • Project Updates
    • Making Infographics
    • Tool review as needed
    • Problems?
  • Assignments for Next Week [Email links to posts to Professor by 5pm on Tuesday at Dauphin@lmu.edu]
    • Read, watch, surf – Tweet a link at me for us to discuss with hashtag #LMUeng381
    • Do next week’s reading and blog about it. What does the economic future of journalism look like? Create an infographic to support your POV
    • First group of site reviews ready
    • [Ongoing: Work on Final Project.]
    • [Ongoing: Track your site.]

Week 10 – November 11 – It’s the End of the World as We Know It

Week 11 – November 18 – Presentations and Project Prep 

  • Assignment Due This Week: Tweets, Second Set of Site Presentations, posts about readings, Project Updates
  • Reading Due This Week
    • TBD
  • Discussion
    • Discussion of #LMUeng381 links
    • Discussion of readings / your blog posts
    • Second Set of Site Presentations
  • Practicum
    • TBD Guest Speaker to provide practicum feedback on video or audio production
    • Project Updates
    • Tool review as needed
    • Problems?
  • Assignments for Next Week [Email links to posts to Professor by 5pm on Tuesday at Dauphin@lmu.edu]
    • Read, watch, surf – Tweet a link at me for us to discuss with hashtag #LMUeng381
    • Open Blog
    • Final set of Presentations ready
    • [Ongoing: Work on Final Project.]
    • [Ongoing: Track your site.]

Thanksgiving Week  – No Class 

Week 12 – December 2 – Individual Conferences and Project Prep

  • Assignment Due This Week: Tweets, Final Set of Site Presentations, Project Updates
  • Discussion
    • Discussion of #eng381 links
    • Final Set of Presentations
  • Practicum
    • TBD Guest Speaker to provide practicum feedback on video or audio production
    • Individual Conferences
    • Project Updates
    • Tool review as needed
    • Problems?
  • Assignments for Next Week [Email links to posts to Professor by 5pm on Tuesday at Dauphin@lmu.edu]
    • [Ongoing: Work on Final Project.]

 Week 13 – December 9 – Final Project Review 

  • Assignment Due This Week: Final Projects – Groups will present their final projects in class.
  • Assignments for Next Week [Email links to posts to Professor by 7pm on Wednesday December 16 at Dauphin@lmu.edu]
    1. Based upon feedback in class, groups may tweak and finesse their final projects
    2. Extra Credit posts (Only by prior approval. Extra credit posts that have not been pre-approved will not be considered.)

Week 14 – December 16 – Final Projects and Extra Credit Posts Due

  • Assignment Due This Week: Final Projects and extra credit posts are due
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